Julius Thompson new Amazon Author Page!


photoPlease visit Julius Thompson’s new: amazon.com/author/juliusthompson

Advertisements

Philadelphia Voices: Andre McCarter on Monday Memories!


Screenshot_2017-07-05-11-13-23 (1) During the seventies when I was a sportswriter for the Philadelphia Bulletin I enjoyed writing feature stories on high school athletes. I wrote my first feature story for the Philadelphia Bulletin about this young man when he won the Markward Award in 1971.
Monday Memories: “Seven Questions from the Seventies” you will learn a little bit more about what made these Philly athletes incredible athletes and players. Today former All-America basketball guard Andre (Magician) from Overbrook High School, one of the all-time great Philly basketball players will answer seven questions about his basketball experiences from the seventies.
Enjoy this trip down memory lane with Andre (Magician) McCarter. I called him that because he was a wizard with the basketball. Andre had super handles!!!
JT: What is your favorite seventies basketball memory?
Andre: Our home on the corner of 22nd and Manton in South Philadelphia was right behind Landreth Elementary School Playground. It had one short full court, but basketball history took place there. Saturday and Sunday morning during the summer, as a ten year old kid, I would wake up early. I was the first one on the court playing by myself and I would stay on the court shooting around until the first game was officially started. They would run me off the court. The Old Heads would shout “Get off the court young boy”. Then right in front of my eyes; Players from Wilt Chamberlain, Guy Rodgers, Al Attles, Ray (Chink) Scott, Earl (The Pearl) Monroe, Dave (My Ball) Riddick and college guys like Kenny Durrett, “Fatty Taylor” and the names went on and on as basketball royalty would show up. It was a wonder to see! I was blessed, as I saw the crowd come to the playground. Landreth was surrounded by cars and players walking from all directions. I would dream as I watched every play year after year. I practiced and dreamed, practiced and dreamed that I would be able to play on the court tone day. I was age fourteen on the Landreth court and I heard these words. “Come on young boy, are you ready?” and I said, “I’m ready!” I was in the land called basketball heaven!

JT: What is your best experience from playing at Overbrook?
Andre: My best experience at Overbrook was helping my great teammates and our Coach Paul Ward win back to back Philadelphia City Championships. Coach was smart enough to give me the basketball straight from Barrett Jr. High school to start with all seniors. My first year we made the playoff, but we lost to a good Southern team led by Roland Tree Grant and “The Beast” Elgrin Green, but that experience taught me what I needed to do if I was going to be ready to reach my goal, championships and we did it!

JT: Give us some of your favorite Paul Ward and John Wooden stories.

Andre: Coach Ward was a wonderful man and a great basketball coach. I loved him. I was so glad I was a part of winning championships that brought him a little of the recognition he deserved. He never sought fame. His greatness helped prepare me for the hand off to my next great person/ coach. John Wooden, whom I also loved, and was blessed to help lead his team where he would witness his last team win the NCAA National Championship in the last game of his legendary career! In conversations years past and playing for them, both Coach Ward and Coach Wooden let me know they loved me too!

JT: Tell us some of your favorite sonny hill league stories?

Andre: Most of my Sonny Hill league memories involved my Sonny Hill league Coach Claude Gross. Watching him interact with each of the many South Philly players was like a Broadway Show. We had characters and Coach Gross was about getting the maximum out of all that talent. There was resistance in some cases, so let the battles begin. From the older guys like Eddie Simon ,Tyrone Davis, Skip Brown to Roland Tree Grant, Willie Cook, Elgin Green, Aaron Sexton, Snuffy Smith, Arthur Mitchell, Joe Bryant and Mo Howard, it was a battle. I was the goodie two shoes. I did not want Coach Gross to holler and rant at me because I wasn’t in shape, did not play hard all the time, did not know my roll on the team or the court or did not play team ball. I figured Coach Gross out almost immediately, he wanted us to follow him and he knew what it took for a team to be winners on the court and tried to get us to be good and smart people making good decisions off the court. Shakespeare’s characters had nothing on the stage presence of Coach Claude Gross’ and his dialogue with his characters (players), He got us to win!
JT: What was it like going from Philly to Los Angeles?
Andre: I was a dreamer as I grew up. I loved Philly my home but I dreamed of other places. Philly to Los Angeles was one of those dreams coming to pass. It was a new world of adventure and and beaches, My Degree from where Jackie Robinson was a four letter sportsman and banners of championships flew in Pauley ( I am going to participate in new banners hanging) Mountains (for snow). The weather was always right for training outside where the Olympians practiced. A dream turned into real moments, now great memories.
JT: Give us some funny moments with your Overbrook teammates?
Andre: It was funny watching a senior laden team realize their beloved legendary head coach Paul Ward had handed them over to be led by a crumb snatching, little, just fresh from Junior high school mug. I eventually won them over, but what they did not realize is that this junior high mug’s goal was to win three straight city championships.

This moment was not funny at the time it happened but later it was funny as time went on. We had lost an important game (well it wasn’t that important of a game but we hated losing to Gratz because they were good) against the rugged Coach John Cheney, Joe Anderson, (A man against boys at just 6″5″ but you thought you were playing a 6’11” 270 pound chiseled strong man), Leon White, who also played above his height and Clarence (Rock) Taylor a small but slick scoring guard. We had lost the game by one point; we did not like the refereeing: no excuses. The whole game in that run into the wall on a layup, cracker-box gym was the type of game a true warrior basketball player loves. The crowd is literally up on you so close you think they are in the game with you. It was a heavyweight championship bout and more than that-the game was on the line. Your manhood or should I say boyhood was on the line and I loved every second of it even though we lost. The locker room or should I say, room, we were in was down these stairs. It was a volatile moment as we exited the court while fans were exiting; there was a verbal barrage as we were mixed in the crowd. The tension in the game and fans being close up to me and my teammates under these conditions got out of hand. I was threatened, I responded in kind which was out of character for me. It was on! Coach Ward dragged me up the stairs as I tried to break lose to confront the hecklers. Later, we all would laugh about what was I going to do against all those crazy fans if I had broken loose from Coach Ward. It was a funny topic when we needed to loosen the tension and it was a bonding laugh at me for our team.

JT: Tell us a favorite basketball moment from growing up in your Philly neighborhood.

Andre: The Christian Street YMCA had a Gray-Y league for elementary schools. The baskets were lowered for that age group. I played for Landreth. We pretty much wiped up the league primarily because I was one of the tallest players and I had the gift of dribble, seeing and passing. So I would just dribble around everyone dunk or get any shot or set up my teammates and we had a few other players. Well, in the championship game things were different. This team had a few players too and they had a plan. They slowed the game down, they had a zone defense and they were focused on me. They were in the denial mode. They wanted this championship bad, and we could sense it, but we fought. We were down by one with about three seconds left on the clock and we were taking the ball out at the far end of the court. I still remember in the time out, everyone knew I was getting the ball and so did the other team. I faked one way, went the other way they threw me the ball I took two long dribbles near the half court and let it fly. You know what happen! that is why I am telling you this story. We won!!! That shot changed my life, ever since then I played hard every minute in games and practice to the end no matter what the score is in basketball and in life.
JT: What is your favorite seventies basketball memory?

Andre: Our home on the corner of 22nd and Manton in South Philadelphia was right behind Landreth Elementary School Playground. It had one short full court, but basketball history took place there. Saturday and Sunday morning during the summer, as a ten year old kid, I would wake up early. I was the first one on the court playing by myself and I would stay on the court shooting around until the first game was officially started. They would run me off the court. The Old Heads would shout “Get off the court young boy”. Then right in front of my eyes; Players from Wilt Chamberlain, Guy Rodgers, Al Attles, Ray (Chink) Scott, Earl (The Pearl) Monroe, Dave (My Ball) Riddick and college guys like Kenny Durrett, “Fatty Taylor” and the names went on and on as basketball royalty would show up. It was a wonder to see! I was blessed, as I saw the crowd come to the playground. Landreth was surrounded by cars and players walking from all directions. I would dream as I watched every play year after year. I practiced and dreamed, practiced and dreamed that I would be able to play on the court one day. I was age fourteen on the Landreth court and I heard these words. “Come on young boy, are you ready?” and I said, “I’m ready!” I was in the land called basketball heaven!

JT: What is your best experience from playing at Overbrook?
Andre: My best experience at Overbrook was helping my great teammates and our Coach Paul Ward win back to back Philadelphia City Championships. Coach was smart enough to give me the basketball straight from Barrett Jr. High school to start with all seniors. My first year we made the playoff, but we lost to a good Southern team led by Roland Tree Grant and “The Beast” Elgrin Green, but that experience taught me what I needed to do if I was going to be ready to reach my goal, championships and we did it!

JT: Give us some of your favorite Paul Ward and John Wooden stories.

Andre: Coach Ward was a wonderful man and a great basketball coach. I loved him. I was so glad I was a part of winning championships that brought him a little of the recognition he deserved. He never sought fame. His greatness helped prepare me for the hand off to my next great person/ coach. John Wooden, whom I also loved, and was blessed to help lead his team where he would witness his last team win the NCAA National Championship in the last game of his legendary career! In conversations years past and playing for them, both Coach Ward and Coach Wooden let me know they loved me too!

JT: Tell us some of your favorite sonny hill league stories?

Andre: Most of my Sonny Hill league memories involved my Sonny Hill league Coach Claude Gross. Watching him interact with each of the many South Philly players was like a Broadway Show. We had characters and Coach Gross was about getting the maximum out of all that talent. There was resistance in some cases, so let the battles begin. From the older guys like Eddie Simon ,Tyrone Davis, Skip Brown to Roland Tree Grant, Willie Cook, Elgin Green, Aaron Sexton, Snuffy Smith, Arthur Mitchell, Joe Bryant Mo Howard, and Maurice Lucas. It was a battle to get harmony among so many talented players. I was the goodie two shoes. I did not want Coach Gross to holler and rant at me because I wasn’t in shape, did not play hard all the time, did not know my roll on the team or the court or did not play team ball. I figured Coach Gross out almost immediately, he wanted us to follow him and he knew what it took for a team to be winners on the court and tried to get us to be good and smart people making good decisions off the court.

Coach Claude”s best theatrical performance was not dialog with the referees ,but at a game in the rec center gym at 21 st and Chew. A player who I will not reveal got up off the bench during the game and went across to the seats, he sat down and began staring and talking to this pretty girl. There is not enough space to write what Claude did; he yelled, had to be held back and jumped up and down, all of that and more. Claude won the Oscar,Tony and Emmy that evening!
Shakespeare’s characters have nothing on the stage presence of Coach Claude Gross’ and his dialogue with his characters (players), He got us to win!
JT: What was it like going from Philly to Los Angeles?
Andre: I was a dreamer as I grew up. I loved Philly my home but I dreamed of other places. Philly to Los Angeles was one of those dreams coming to pass. It was a new world of adventure and and beaches, My Degree from where Jackie Robinson was a four letter sportsman and banners of championships flew in Pauley ( I am going to participate in new banners hanging) Mountains (for snow). The weather was always right for training outside where the Olympians practiced. A dream turned into real moments, now great memories.
JT: Give us some funny moments with your Overbrook teammates?
Andre: It was funny watching a senior laden team realize their beloved legendary head coach Paul Ward had handed them over to be led by a crumb snatching, little, just fresh from Junior high school mug. I eventually won them over, but what they did not realize is that this junior high mug’s goal was to win three straight city championships.
This moment was not funny at the time it happened but later it was funny as time went on. We had lost an important game (well it wasn’t that important of a game but we hated losing to Gratz because they were good) against the rugged Coach John Cheney, Joe Anderson, (A man against boys at just 6″5″ but you thought you were playing a 6’11” 270 pound chiseled strong man), Leon White, who also played above his height and Clarence (Rock) Taylor a small but slick scoring guard. We had lost the game by one point; we did not like the refereeing: no excuses. The whole game in that run into the wall on a layup, cracker-box gym was the type of game a true warrior basketball player loves. The crowd is literally up on you so close you think they are in the game with you. It was a heavyweight championship bout and more than that-the game was on the line. Your manhood or should I say boyhood was on the line and I loved every second of it even though we lost. The locker room or should I say, room, we were in was up these stairs. It was a volatile moment as we exited the court while fans were exiting; there was a verbal barrage as we were mixed in the crowd. The tension in the game and fans being close up to me and my teammates under these conditions got out of hand. I was threatened, I responded in kind which was out of character for me. It was on! Coach Ward dragged

A Brownstone in Brooklyn Book Review!


Brownsotne5.0 out of 5 stars A YOUNG BLACK MAN GROWING UP IN THE TURBULENT 60`S
By DENNIS DE ROSE on April 9, 2013
Format: Paperback
Julius Thompson`s “A Brownstone in Brooklyn” is about a young driven Black man,his family and his Brooklyn brownstone neighbors and friends. Julius has the uncanny ability to write with such intensity that you can`t help but feel that you were actually walking right next to Andy Pilgrim as be experienced,firsthand, the love of his family,friends and neighbors and their drive to push him to be all that he can be. Unfortunately, life is not that ideal. Andy experiences some very trying life lessons..the extreme jealously of an old friend to the point of dire consequences; black and white prejudices, again with dire consequences; and last, but certainly not least, the race riots of the late 60`s that affected many inner city communities. He witnesses rioting,shootings,death,looting,burning buildings and severe property damage.

As a White man, I knew very little about the late 60`s race riots and Julius has helped me to see, firsthand, the extreme feelings and the emotions that people, both back and white, went through during that time. At that time, I was a self-absorbed teenager and I was not affected by those events, so I felt nothing for others that it affected. This book has altered my sensitivity to others unlike myself. It has provided me with a closer look at Black issues of the times.

There are also some underlying issues that Andy is dealing with during this time in his life. I will not delve into them; I do not want to spoil it for future readers of Brownstone.

Julius Thompson has done a wonderful job with “Brownstone in Brooklyn”. If you like it, and I hope you will, I know you will want to read the next two books in the Andy Pilgrim saga; I can’t wait. Julius, please keep writing;you are doing a wonderful job…

Julius, I would be remiss if I did not tell you that your editor did a wonderful job with this book; I could not find one mistake.

Philly Style and Philly Profile Free Audiobook!


jetphilly The audiobook of Philly Style and Philly Profile is on Audible, Amazon, and iTunes. To help spread the word, I am giving 10 complimentary Audible.com copies of the audiobook to the first ten people who contact me on my web page:
<a href="http://www.juliusthompson.com/contact.html
I will email the code and the instructions to receive the Philly Style and Philly Profile audiobook. All I ask is that you post a review on Amazon.Com. I will alert when the first ten codes have been given out.
Short Synopsis: Philadelphia streets were never silent. Gangs wars on corners, screeching cars on avenues, and squealing steel trolley tires on tracks kept you alert for the next confrontation. Philadelphia playgrounds were sometimes silent. These were sanctuaries where you confronted your deepest memories. These were places packed with people, but on a summer’s midday, they were virtually empty. Streets made habitable again by the actions of a few good men.

Julius Thompson Philadelphia Bulletin Memories!


Juliust437 For the past few Mondays, I have talked about the Meccas of basketball in Philadelphia: the historic Philly playgrounds, unique high school basketball gyms, McGonigle Hall and The Palestra.

Today, I want to talk about the sports department of the Philadelphia Bulletin that was unique and told a story about an era in Philly sports that was outstanding and will never be duplicated again. The people, places and events formed a narrative that gave a group of coaches and athletes exposure that was unique.

Herm Rogul: People in Sports – Gave exposure to all athletes and events in Philly that was ordinary and extraordinary at the same time. Late at night when we were “Putting the Paper to Bed”,newspaper term for finishing the first edition. I would sit and talk with Herm and asked him why he wrote the column? He told me he wanted everybody who participated in sports to have their name in print and get a moment of glory. Very simple and very effective!

Frank Brady and Frank “Bivo” Bilovsky: The Big Five – These two basketball gurus gave the exposure to the best basketball teams in America. Some of their best stories were about Jack Kraft at Villanova, Harry Litwack at Temple, Paul Westhead at LaSalle, Jimmy O’Brien at St. Joseph’s and at Chuck Daily at Penn. The stories of the other coaches and players were too numerous to repeat. Funny stories abound!

Jack Freed on Boxing: He was the original Matt Ring and was around for some of the great fights of all time from the 1930s to the 1970s, including Ali-Frazer “Thrilla in Manilla”.

Bob Savett: High School Sports and Penn Athletics: He was my mentor when I arrived in Philly. He showed me the insides of covering Philly sports and was at my first assignment in covering Andre McCarter at the Markward Club.

Bob Wright: Brought life to high school sports in South Jersey communities in the form of inspiring columns.

Ted Silary: I gave a recommendation for this sports reporter to get a job at The Bulletin from a suburban paper in Montgomery County. He left The Bulletin for an outstanding career with the Daily News.

Julius J.E. Thompson: High School Sports: One of my all-time incredible stories was not basketball, but football.

Bok Tech, under Frank Guida, had not won a game that year and had not scored a single point. They were losing at West Philly and had been outscored, 379-0, nearing the end of the last game of the season.

With less than two minutes Bok was driving and got to the West Philly goal line with time running out. The running back slipped when he was about to cross the goal line as the buzzer sounded. They were within inches of scoring a touchdown.

They fought to the very end of the game and never gave up. That South Philly ‘Grit’ can be found in all athletes bred south of Market Street.

I asked Coach Guida, a good coach and even better man, could I ride the team bus back and get a feel for his team.
We were nearing the Schuylkill Expressway, when a Bok player asked the question:

“What was the score?”

Someone answered, “I can tell you our half… ‘nothing’.”

The bus ride was silent until we arrived at Bok Tech.

That’s Philly sports: Honest, heart felt and very, very real.

I wrote a column about that football team, and Coach Guida how he developed men with character. The title of the Column: “The Inner City Blues.”

His players learned that losing was a part of life and how you handled adversity showed more about your character and how you would handle tough situations that arise in your future.

Philly Sports is winning, losing and handling adversity. This was shown in the many columns of the magnificent seventies’ Philadelphia Bulletin sportswriters.

Philly Style and Philly Profile Audible.com Reviews!


on November 23, 2016
The story follows the life of Carl, a basketball star, whose life is now suddenly under threat, by the gangs who inhabit the city of Philadelphia. His good looks, name and the glory that followed him, only make him a likely target in the eyes of Jake Meyers, a master drug dealer, who is jealous of him. Andy, a sportswriter, gets involved unknowingly, when he is handed over a bag, which has killed all those in possession of it. The unfolding of events, over the course of a few days, surrounding the brown leather bag, unravels many mysteries.

The book showcases how good and evil coexist and a handful of people’s attempts, to change a society involved in drugs and gangs. The author takes you on a journey, through the streets of Philadelphia, keeping you in suspense, along the whole way.

While neither the title, nor the cover does justice to the storyline, the old adage “Don’t judge a book by its cover” stands true in this case. The story is very well written, providing insightful glimpses into the lives of the ordinary citizens in Philadelphia, during the 70’s and their struggles with gangsters and drug peddlers.

 
on April 9, 2013
This is the second book of the Andy Pilgrim trilogy.While the title does not try to explain the book,that was the author`s intent.The title refers to something special, specific to the city of Philadelphia only. You have to read the book very carefully to understand what Julius is trying to say. He is being pervasive on purpose. This second book leads into the final book of the trilogy, “Ghost of Atlanta”

“Philly Style, Philly Profile” takes place in the 70’s.Andy, a black man, works for the Philly Bulletin.He is immediately confronted by one of the many problems that black men had to deal with then and now…RACISM.That`s just one central issue. Added, we find out that he is slated to cover high school sports and we are immediately introduced to 2 more very dangerous threats…DRUGS and GANGS.

Andy gets caught up deeply in this mix when he befriends Carl, an up and coming basketball player whose getting ready to go off to college in just a few days. I won`t spoil the story for you but I will say that it`s extremely fast-paced and relevant for the times. Of course all cities big and small sadly still face these same issues.

You will read this and, once you do, you`ll want to continue the saga in “Ghost of Atlanta”.I would be remiss if I did not take a moment and mention the fantastic editing in this super story. I read this, looking for mistakes and I found very few. My hat`s off to Julius’ editor, Moneysaver Editing. Keep writing Julius, great job!

 

Audible:

http://www.audible.com/search/166-4110991-0848005?advsearchKeywords=Philly+Style+ad+Philly+Profile

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Philly-Style-and-Profile/dp/B01M3Y6683/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Jumpstarting Your Inner Novelist: Jump Starting Your Inner Novelist is a concise manual that provides inspiration, motivation and practical tools for crafting award-winning novels.

Ordering Audio Information:

Audible: http://www.audible.com/search/ref=a_search_tseft__galileo?advsearchKeywords=Jumpstarting+Your+Inner++Novelist&x=14&y=22

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Jumpstarting-Your-Inner-Novelist/dp/B01MG8PASM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Julius Thompson New Audiobooks!


43196Wow! It feels incredible that I have two of my books on Audio Books..

Laura Jackman did a wonderful job with Jumpstarting Your Inner Novelist that I co-Authored with my editor Dennis DeRose.

Roger Wood did a fantastic narration in bringing my novel, Philly Style and Philly Profile to Life.

       Please check out my audio books on Audible, iTunes and Amazon.com.

        Philly Style and Philly Profile: Philadelphia streets were never silent. Gang wars on corners, screeching cars on avenues, and squealing steel trolley tires on tracks kept you alert for the next confrontation. The playgrounds were sometimes silent. These were sanctuaries where you confronted your deepest memories; places packed with people, but were virtually empty on late summer mid-days. Streets that were made habitable again by the actions of a few good men.

Ordering Audio Information:

Audible:

http://www.audible.com/search/166-4110991-0848005?advsearchKeywords=Philly+Style+ad+Philly+Profile

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Philly-Style-and-Profile/dp/B01M3Y6683/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

Jumpstarting Your Inner Novelist: Jump Starting Your Inner Novelist is a concise manual that provides inspiration, motivation and practical tools for crafting award-winning novels.

Ordering Audio Information:

Audible: http://www.audible.com/search/ref=a_search_tseft__galileo?advsearchKeywords=Jumpstarting+Your+Inner++Novelist&x=14&y=22

Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/Jumpstarting-Your-Inner-Novelist/dp/B01MG8PASM/ref=tmm_aud_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=